Sony Pictures Hack Reveals Stark Gender Pay GapPhoto by Nic McPhee

Sony Pictures Hack Reveals Stark Gender Pay Gap

At Sony’s Columbia Pictures division, a man and a woman have the same job and—oh dear, this is awkward—he’s making close to a million dollars more.

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How (and How Not) to Break Up With a Roommate (TNR.com)Photo by Alli Stancil

How (and How Not) to Break Up With a Roommate (TNR.com)

Once a temporary holdover from college life, platonic cohabitation is now carrying some city dwellers through their twenties and into their thirties. Being a roommate becomes a significant (if subconscious) part of their identities; for those lucky enough to find a stable, long-term roommate setup, it also provides a defining partnership. All of which makes the eventual break-up of these sustained roommate relationships a new rite of passage.

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Baby, You Can’t Drive My Car: Why does the auto industry get women so wrong?

Baby, You Can’t Drive My Car: Why does the auto industry get women so wrong?

It was the soft gruntings of subjects’ reptilian brains, Rapaille says, that clued him in to the fact that women are obsessed with cup holders. Cup holders signify coffee, he says, and coffee signifies safety, and safety is what women want most in cars.

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Oxytots: Instead of learning from the unfounded hysteria of the crack baby era, we’re repeating it (Slate)Photo by Roberto Carlos Pecino Martinez

Oxytots: Instead of learning from the unfounded hysteria of the crack baby era, we’re repeating it (Slate)

As we now know, the mass hysteria over “crack babies” and their deviant mothers was unfounded. Crack cocaine doesn’t do the kind of damage we thought it did to developing babies. Unfortunately, instead of learning from this heady mix of bad science, a sensationalist press, over-reaching prosecutors, and the narrative of the selfish mother content to damage her baby, we’re repeating it.

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TV producers think boys won’t watch girl heroines. Turns out that’s not true. (Slate)Image courtesy of Disney Junior.

TV producers think boys won’t watch girl heroines. Turns out that’s not true. (Slate)

It’s 2013, not 1985, but it’s still considerably harder for my preschool-age daughter to find representations of herself onscreen then it will be for our newborn son, once he starts watching TV.

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